Monthly Archives: January 2006

What It Takes

Heard this on the radio tonight…long story, but it stuck

From the Aerosmith Song:

There goes my old girlfriend, there’s another diamond ring
And, uh, all those late night promises I guess they don’t mean a thing
So baby, what’s the story? Did you find another man?
Is it easy to sleep in the bed that we made?
When you don’t look back I guess the feelings start to fade away.
I used to feel your fire
But now it’s cold inside
And you’re back on the street like you didn’t miss a beat, yeah

Tell me what it takes to let you go
Tell me how the pain’s supposed to go
Tell me how it is that you can sleep in the night
Without thinking you lost everything that was good in your life to the toss of the dice?
Tell me what it takes to let you go.

Girl, before I met you I was F.I.N.E. Fine
but your love made me a prisoner, yeah my heart’s been doing time
You spent me up like money, then you hung me out to dry
It was easy to keep all your lies in disguise
Cause you had me in deep with the devil in your eyes

Tell me what it takes to let you go
Tell me how the pain’s supposed to go
Tell me how it is that you can sleep in the night
Without thinking you lost everything that was good in your life to the toss of the dice?
Tell me what it takes to let you go.

Tell me that you’re happy that you’re on your own Yeah, yeah, yeah
Tell me that it’s better when you’re all alone
Tell me that your body doesn’t miss my touch
Tell me that my lovin’ didn’t mean that much
Tell me you ain’t dyin’ when you’re cryin’ for me

Tell me what it takes to let you go
Tell me how the pain’s supposed to go
Tell me how it is that you can sleep in the night
Without thinking you lost everything that was good in your life to the toss of the dice?

Tell me what it takes to let you go
Tell me how the pain’s supposed to go
Tell me how it is that you can sleep in the night
Without thinking you lost everything that was good in your life to the toss of the dice?
Tell me who’s to blame for thinkin’ twice
No no no no ’cause I don’t wanna burn in paradise
Ooo Let go, let go, let go,
let it go, let it go, let it go, let it go, let it go, let it go, let it go, let it go,
let it go, let it go, let it go, let it go, let it go
I don’t wanna burn, I don’t wanna burn

Categories: Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Pics From New Year’s

Here are a few pictures from New Year’s Eve…I was behind the bar at the Lion.



Carol And Me



Zeus and Me showing off our matching hats!



Is it me or do I look a little crazy in this picture?




Blowing some bubbles




Jenn and Methos


Categories: Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Today’s History Brief: Meiji Restoration in Japan (1868)

In an event that heralds the birth of modern Japan, patriotic samurai from Japan’s outlying domains join with anti-shogunate nobles in restoring the emperor to power after 700 years. The impetus for the coup was a fear by many Japanese that the nation’s feudal leaders were ill equipped to resist the threat of foreign domination. Soon after seizing power, the young Emperor Meiji and his ministers moved the royal court from Kyoto to Tokyo, dismantled feudalism, and enacted widespread reforms along Western models. The newly unified Japanese government also set off on a path of rapid industrialization and militarization, building Japan into a major world power by the early 20th century.

Categories: Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Today’s History Lesson: Let There Be Light

EDISON DEMONSTRATES INCANDESCENT LIGHT:
December 31, 1879

In the first public demonstration of his incandescent lightbulb, American
inventor Thomas Alva Edison lights up a street in Menlo Park, New Jersey. The
Pennsylvania Railroad Company ran special trains to Menlo Park on the day of the
demonstration in response to public enthusiasm over the event.Although the first
incandescent lamp had been produced 40 years earlier, no inventor had been able
to come up with a practical design until Edison embraced the challenge in the
late 1870s. After countless tests, he developed a high-resistance carbon-thread
filament that burned steadily for hours and an electric generator sophisticated
enough to power a large lighting system.Born in Milan, Ohio, in 1847, Edison
received little formal schooling, which was customary for most Americans at the
time. He developed serious hearing problems at an early age, and this disability
provided the motivation for many of his inventions. At age 16, he found work as
a telegraph operator and soon was devoting much of his energy and natural
ingenuity toward improving the telegraph system itself. By 1869, he was pursuing
invention full-time and in 1876 moved into a laboratory and machine shop in
Menlo Park, New Jersey.Edison’s experiments were guided by his remarkable
intuition, but he also took care to employ assistants who provided the
mathematical and technical expertise he lacked. At Menlo Park, Edison continued
his work on the telegraph, and in 1877 he stumbled on one of his great
inventions–the phonograph–while working on a way to record telephone
communication. Public demonstrations of the phonograph made the Yankee inventor
world famous, and he was dubbed the “Wizard of Menlo Park.”Although the
discovery of a way to record and play back sound ensured him a place in the
annals of history, the phonograph was only the first of several Edison creations
that would transform late 19th-century life. Among other notable inventions,
Edison and his assistants developed the first practical incandescent lightbulb
in 1879 and a forerunner of the movie camera and projector in the late 1880s. In
1887, he opened the world’s first industrial research laboratory at West Orange,
New Jersey where he employed dozens of workers to investigate systematically a
given subject.Perhaps his greatest contribution to the modern industrial world
came from his work in electricity. He developed a complete electrical
distribution system for light and power, set up the world’s first power plant in
New York City, and invented the alkaline battery, the first electric railroad,
and a host of other inventions that laid the basis for the modern electrical
world. One of the most prolific inventors in history, he continued to work into
his 80s and acquired 1,093 patents in his lifetime. He died in 1931 at the age
of 84.

from http://www.history.com

Categories: Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Powered by WordPress.com.

%d bloggers like this: